Is Contributing to Open Source Right for You?

New to open source and wondering where to start?

Andre Arko, Cloud City Development senior developer and lead developer of Bundler, the Ruby dependency manager, has three questions you should ask yourself before diving in. Then once you've answered why open source (and confirmed you have the time), he shares his 15 minute a day blueprint to go from Open Source Newbie to Core Contributor.

How to Include People in Tech

Five lessons from open source projects that can be more broadly applied to include people in projects, teams and communities.

Improving diversity in tech won’t happen overnight and can’t start until we include everyone. Andre Arko covers five things he’s seen and experienced over the last six years of working on Bundler. Before jumping in blindly, keep in mind that they may not work for everyone. Pay attention to how tech as a field mistreats underrepresented people and actively work to fix it.

Including People: Why It Matters

While diversity gets a lot of press--in tech in general and in the Ruby community--inclusion is what we need to focus on.

At Cloud City Development, we care a lot about people--treating them humanely, helping them accomplish their goals, and working together to make the field of tech and the world a better place. Andre Arko shares five reasons why including people in tech matters and why everyone, not just marginalized or excluded people must speak up.

How Bundler Works: A History of Ruby Dependency Management

This post was originally given as a presentation at RailsConf 2015.

Using Ruby code written by other developers is easy! Just add it to your Gemfile, run bundle install, and start using it.

But what's really happening when you do that? How can use you someone else's code just by putting it in your Gemfile?

TCP Delays and Retransmissions on Illumos

The other day, I helped debug an issue on some production Joyent Cloud servers (which use SmartOS, based on Illumos, the open-source successor to Solaris). The solution turned out to be so non-obvious, and the cause pretty interesting, so I thought it was worth writing up.

The New Rubygems Index Format

This post is a part news, part technical documentation, and part request for comment. I’m going to explain the technical nitty-gritty details of the planned next generation index that allows Bundler and Rubygems to know what gems exist and how to install them.

How to be an ally

So I titled this “How to be an ally,” but that’s a lie. You can’t be an ally. No one can. Ally-ness isn’t something that you can have intrinsically, any more than you can inherently be kindness, or rudeness. You can do ally actions. So probably a better name for this is How To Do Ally Work. But I’m getting a bit ahead of myself.

Extreme Makeover: Rubygems Edition

Bundler, Rubygems, and rubygems.org are vital infrastructure that every Rubyist uses just about every day. Over the last year, that infrastructure has seen a huge amount of change. This is an overview of the changes, an update on where things are now, and an explanation of where we’re going soon.

Rails Israel 2013: Rubygems, Bundler, and Production Is an Iceberg

Last week I went to Tel Aviv, Israel for the Rails Israel and DevConTLV conferences, where I gave three talks on new developments in the Ruby community. The first talk was about how Bundler took down Rubygems.org last year, what we did to fix it, and the lessons that we learned as a result.

Security Is Hard, but We Can't Go Shopping

Security is a hard topic. It’s an especially hard topic in the Ruby community, where the security situation has historically been so great that hardly anyone has had to care about it. You may not know this, depending on how long you’ve been a rubyist, but Ruby security issues usually only come up once or maybe twice per year. They’re usually relatively benign, as those things go, so everyone updates as soon as it’s convenient, and life goes on.
Development
Design
Community
We Tweet Often
@CloudCityIO
Filter